Deadly Ever After

Archive for the tag “Summer Wier”

Interview with Summer Wier, author of Sci Fi YA, LINK!

TODAY’S BREW: More than you can imagine.

By Julie

Last week was the release of LINK by Summer Wier, a book near and dear to my heart. I had the divine pleasure of editing this book, and to see it come to life from start to finish is wonderful. It’s almost as near and dear as Summer herself, who is one of the greatest champions of my work and the one who insisted THE HARPY become a REUTS Publications book next year. I knuckled my way into Summer’s busy schedule to ask her a bunch of questions about LINK, which is one of the most unique YA sci fi books ever.

link-final-front

  • I love the unique way stars are used in LINK. Different than any sci fi or fantasy I have ever read. Where the heck did that come from? Are you a science geek or did you have the idea and need to find a way to make it come alive?
Why thank you! That’s such an amazing compliment. I think I’m definitely more geeky now than I ever would have admitted growing up, but I’ve always loved astronomy and astrology (two very different takes on similar things). When I set out to write a book, my original idea had nothing to do with stars or space, but focused on the connection between two characters who were separated by something I hadn’t figured out yet. It took me forever to even start writing because I didn’t know what I wanted the book to be or what would make it different from so many young adult stories that were already on the shelves. One day, I stumbled across this NASA clip “Black Hole Eats Star, Beams Signal to Earth” (https://youtu.be/2j04JEjKMjg) and I was so fascinated by it, I swear I watched it a hundred times. As I played the video over and over, it was like I’d found the piece I was missing for my story. LINK’s world, partly based on real science, partly imagination, mapped itself out in my mind, and at that moment I knew exactly where my story needed to go.
  • Kira’s relationship with her mother and her views on her mom’s life fascinated me. Tell me a little about how their relationship evolves in this book, if you could without giving too much away. 🙂
This is one of those areas where I used perspectives from my youth and parenting experiences, and blended them together. As a parent, I thought about how many things happen in life that children are completely oblivious to, or if they are aware of “things” they don’t always know the truth behind the story. In LINK, we see Kira’s perspective of what she believes is “truth” based on her experiences with her mother, and also what she’s created in her mind so that she can cope with what she thinks has happened between her mother and father. As the story evolves, Kira begins to piece together clues that shed more light on the events contributing to her parents’ past. And when she learns the “truth,” she gets a peek into her mother’s perspective and the reasoning for everything she did to protect Kira. With secrets revealed, Kira gains a new look on life and grows closer to her mother!
  • You created a really cool dreamscape sort of alternate world, which you managed to make unnerving and a little scary without any monsters. How did you do it?
I think black holes carry an uncertainty that contributed to the natural mystery of the world I created. I mean, what the heck is inside there?! No one really knows. There is so much left to discover in our galaxy, universe, and beyond—anything is possible! As my theories evolved from the NASA video, I let my imagination run wild with the kinds of landscapes one might see in a world pieced together in the way they’re fabricated in LINK, how this world would sustain itself in such an atmosphere, and who would inhabit it. Mix in the disorientation from traveling by starlight and who wouldn’t be a little creeped out with what awaits on the inside?
  • What is the message you want your readers to take from LINK?
Science changes everyday; life is ever-evolving. When I started writing LINK, so many of my ideas went against everything science believed about black holes (hence the fiction part). Take this simple definition of black holes from Wikipedia, “A black hole is a region of space-time exhibiting such strong gravitational effects that nothing—including particles and electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from inside it.” The NASA clip I shared earlier was a first look at a celestial event that totally changed that definition. And now, leaders in the science community have totally changed their positions on what’s possible when it comes to black holes, even so far as to share theories remarkably similar to those I created for LINK! (See article here: http://news.sky.com/story/1541609/hawking-black-holes-may-lead-to-other-universes) So my message to readers is: Anything is possible. Nothing is written in stone. Question. Explore. Create. The sky’s the limit.

Thanks so much for having me today! ❤
YOU GUYS PLEASE BUY LINK AND LOVE EVERY SECOND OF IT.Dreamy, fluid, and beautiful, Link pairs the mystery of science fiction with the minor-key melody of a dark fantasy, creating a tale that is as human as it is out of this world.

Available now from Amazon, and other retailers.

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LINK Release Day! Trailer and Massive Giveaway!!

TODAY’S BREW: I’m drinking pumpkin spice out of a jack-o-lantern

By Julie

HAPPY RELEASE DAY, LINK AND THE AMAZING SUMMER WIER!!!

For seventeen-year-old Kira, there’s no better way to celebrate a birthday than being surrounded by friends and huddled beside a campfire deep in the woods. And with a birthday in the peak of summer, that includes late night swims under the stars. Or at least, it used to. Kira’s relaxing contemplation of the universe is interrupted when a piece of it falls, colliding with her and starting a chain of events that could unexpectedly lead to the one thing in her life that’s missing—her father. Tossed into a pieced-together world of carnivals and gypsies, an old-fashioned farmhouse, and the alluring presence of a boy from another planet, Kira discovers she’s been transported to the center of a black hole, and there’s more to the story than science can explain. She’s now linked by starlight to the world inside the darkness. And her star is dying. If she doesn’t return home before the star’s light disappears and her link breaks, she’ll be trapped forever. But she’s not the only one ensnared, and with time running out, she’ll have to find a way to save a part of her past and a part of her future, or risk losing everything she loves. Dreamy, fluid, and beautiful, Link pairs the mystery of science fiction with the minor-key melody of a dark fantasy, creating a tale that is as human as it is out of this world.  Available now from Amazon, and other retailers.

AND IN HONOR OF LINK WHICH I HAVE ALREADY READ AND LOVE LIKE YOU CAN’T BELIEVE, A MONTH LONG GIVEAWAY!!!

LINKGiveaway Graphic

Giveaway Link: https://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/2d2042a46/

Summer Wier

About Summer Wier:

Summer Wier is an MBA toting accountant, undercover writer, and all around jack-of-all-trades.  Link is her debut novel and the first in The Shadow of Light series. She has three short stories appearing in Fairly Twisted Tales For A Horribly Ever After and co-authors the Splinter web serial. When she’s not digging through spreadsheets or playing mom, you can find her reading/writing, cooking, or dreaming of the mountains in Montana. Check out more of YA author Summer Wier on her blog, twitter, facebook, and goodreads.

Cover Reveal! LINK by Summer Wier

TODAY’S BREW: *pulls up bucket of grounds*

By Julie

I’m sooooooooooooooo happy to reveal the cover for LINK by Summer Wier! I know this book very well and can’t WAIT for the rest of you to hold it in your grubby hands. Without further ado:

link-final-front

About LINK:
For seventeen-year-old Kira, there’s no better way to celebrate a birthday than being surrounded by friends and huddled beside a campfire deep in the woods. And with a birthday in the peak of summer, that includes late night swims under the stars.

Or at least, it used to.

Kira’s relaxing contemplation of the universe is interrupted when a piece of it falls, colliding with her and starting a chain of events that could unexpectedly lead to the one thing in her life that’s missing—her father.

Tossed into a pieced-together world of carnivals and gypsies, an old-fashioned farmhouse, and the alluring presence of a boy from another planet, Kira discovers she’s been transported to the center of a black hole, and there’s more to the story than science can explain. She’s now linked by starlight to the world inside the darkness. And her star is dying.

If she doesn’t return home before the star’s light disappears and her link breaks, she’ll be trapped forever. But she’s not the only one ensnared, and with time running out, she’ll have to find a way to save a part of her past and a part of her future, or risk losing everything she loves.
Dreamy, fluid, and beautiful, LINK pairs the mystery of science fiction with the minor-key melody of a dark fantasy, creating a tale that is as human as it is out of this world.

Add LINK on Goodreads! https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23111822-link

About The Author:

Summer Wier

Summer Wier grew up spending Saturdays with a maxed out library card and her nose in a book. But as much as she loved reading, and even writing, both took the back seat when it came to career choices. With her sights set on law school, corporate greatness, and even a hankering to become the first female president, she set off to conquer the world. As life would have it, though, she didn’t attend law school, nor did she become president (although, one day, your vote may be appreciated), finding her strengths, instead, in accounting and business management. After finishing her MBA, she revived her love for reading and began writing with dreams of finishing a book of her own. When Summer isn’t working, reading, or writing, she’s trying to keep up with two energetic girls and her husband, and dreaming of the mountains of Montana.

LINK is her debut young adult sci-fi novel, the first in THE SHADOW OF LIGHT trilogy.

Find more of Author Summer Wier on her website, twitter, facebook, or goodreads.

THE HARPY IS COMING TO LIFE WITH REUTS PUBLICATIONS!

TODAY’S BREW: champagne.

By Julie

I’ve been waiting to give this news for a long time. Another day will be ALL MY FEELINGS about it. There are so many.

Read the full press release here: http://blog.reuts.com/julie_hutchings_signs_the_harpy/

Julie Hutchings Signs Dark Fantasy/Horror Mythology with REUTS

Posted by on Jun 4, 2015 in Press Release | No Comments

a-harpy

It’s about to get dark and twisted up in here. That’s the life Charity Blake lives in the newest addition to the REUTS collection—THE HARPY, by the lovely Julie Hutchings. In this incredibly moving and imaginative tale, Julie brings the mythology of the harpy to life in a way you’ve never seen before. We’re thrilled to bring this amazing story to the world! And trust us, it’s all parts dark and all parts twisted to become 200% awesome. It’s not for the faint of heart, that’s for sure, but it will have you holding your breath, choking back tears, and vigorously turning pages until the very end. Read a little bit about it:

“Hutchings beautifully breathes life into anti-heroine Charity Blake in a way that punches your gut and pulls at your heart at the same time. When eternity in Hell is more appealing than the life she’s made, Charity has to question if it’s possible to fix what–and who–she’s broken. The Harpy delivers a powerful story of hurt, revenge, and redemption, with emotion-filled prose and gripping imagery.”

March Madness Flash Fiction: LOVE IMAGINED by Summer Wier

TODAY’S BREW: Dunkin’s mediumcoconuthotcoffeelightnosugar (all one word, as ordered)

By Julie

Summer Wier is the most delightfully sweet, caring, and joyous person I’ve ever had the pleasure of knowing and working with. And yet, she still likes me. Even better, she writes with the beauty of modern fairy tales, and she’s pretty.

LOVE IMAGINED

by Summer Wier

I wonder if I’ve ever been in love. Not the kind of love I feel for my mom and dad, but the kind Barbie sings about in all of her fancy princess movies. The servants and people of the town join in, singing and dancing. Even the animals seem to know when that special magic is in the air.

Maybe being in love makes you want to sing all the time. I like to sing and dance anyway, so it’s been harder for me to tell. And animals don’t even talk in real life, so they can’t be trusted with matters of the heart.

There are lots of kids at school who have boyfriends and girlfriends. I’m not sure that sort of thing qualifies as love, because there’s nothing romantic about holding dirty, sweaty hands and sharing mac and cheese at lunch—nothing to sing about anyway. And kids my age break up a lot, swapping girlfriends and boyfriends like hockey cards. There’s nothing happily ever after about that.

A lot of songs say love is never wanting to be apart from someone. But if Justin Bieber can’t keep a girlfriend on that merit, I’m not sure what chance the rest of us have. I could imagine something close to that though, always thinking about someone.

It’s hard for me to think about anything besides the boy with the brown and yellow hair.

Last summer, my family went to our annual neighborhood bar-b-que. Everyone brings food, we set up games in the yard, and I play with my friends all day. This year, the old man across the street had his grandkids visiting.  I hadn’t seen them much because they did a lot of touristy things while they were here, but someone invited them to our party, and they came.

Nobody introduced us, so I didn’t even catch his name. But as we traveled down opposite sides of the picnic table, our eyes met when he offered to put ketchup on my burger. His hair was brown and yellow, just like mine, and our eyes matched the color of a cornflower crayon. He had more freckles than me, but that made him even cuter. I definitely wanted ketchup. He looked like someone I could share mac and cheese with.

I hoped fate would tie us together in the three-legged race or match us together in the stick pull. Although his older brother was eager to join in our games and competitions, the boy with the brown and yellow hair sat quietly by himself. The day wore on, and he never budged. Normally I would run all over the street, playing tag and circling through the activities, but instead I stayed near that tree, hoping to catch his eye or have a reason to talk to him.

But my chance never came.

The sun dipped lower in the sky, and I knew it was already past my bedtime. It was time to clean up, and one by one families started to go home. Including the boy with the brown and yellow hair.

It’s been a year since that day, and for some reason I can’t seem to get the boy out of my mind. My mom had snapped a picture of him as she made the rounds with her camera. I had her print it out, and I keep it on my dresser.

Sometimes I dream that he’s a prince and I’m a princess, but not like in one of those Barbie stories. Besides, if an evil duke or crazy butterfly fairy ever tried to take me prisoner, I wouldn’t wait around to be rescued. It’s lucky I know karate, because I would ki-ya! them both and run for the hills.

I also imagine he’s my boyfriend and that he thinks about me too. On our first date he would take me to McDonald’s, and he wouldn’t care if I ate all of his fries. In my mind, that’s real love right there.

Even though my mom says I can’t be in love with someone I haven’t really met, I wonder if this warm, fluttery feeling could be love. It’s different from the excitement of Christmas morning or the whoosh of a rollercoaster, but I see how it could make people want to sing. Mom says there are lots of different ways to love people, and someday I’ll understand what it means to be in love. I’m not very patient, but I believe her.

Until then, I’ll hold this feeling in my heart, my own magical gift from him. And maybe, just maybe, my someday will include the boy with the brown and yellow hair.

Summer Wier

Summer Wier is an MBA toting accountant, undercover writer, and all around jack-of-all-trades. Link is her debut novel and the first in The Shadow of Light series. She has short stories appearing in Fairly Twisted Tales For A Horribly Ever After and co-authors the Splinter web serial. Summer is the Marketing Director and a member of the acquisitions team at REUTS Publications. When she’s not digging through spreadsheets or playing mom, you can find her reading/writing, cooking, or dreaming of the mountains in Montana.

Connect with Summer on Twitter @summerwier or visit her website at http://www.summerwier.com.

How Not To Write Meaningless Stuff

TODAY’S BREW: Spiked Eggnog. Basically, I’ve been drinking it for a month

By Julie

I’m lucky enough to be reading THE SHADOW OF LIGHT by Summer Wier, a YA novel that I cannot wait to be published. We’re working on doing something you don’t hear much about—ADDING text, as she’s a sparse writer, something that I can identify with after writing THE HARPY and THE ANIMAL, and something I have to loosen up on in writing the sequel to RUNNING HOME, as that series is written with a bit more flourish.

Summer does a great job of still giving little details that tell you so much about  the characters without hitting you in the face with backstory and a lot of “she was this” and “she likes that.” Here’s the example that made me need to write this post:

“We brought your favorites—black olive and jalapeno pizza and strawberry cake.”  Faye was the only other person I knew who liked jalapenos on pizza.

I winked.  “You know me so well.”

This could have so easily been:

“We brought pizza and cake.” Faye loved pizza, and I didn’t care what I ate as long as it was edible.

“God, I’m starving.”

This is a tidbit that is absolutely meaningless in the long run. They got pizza and cake, whatever. But in Summer’s version, we see that our main character likes strong flavors, implying that she has strong opinions and probably isn’t a quiet onlooker about much of anything. I love the cheeky little wink. You also see that Faye is very close to her, that they know each other well without her having to say so.

In the two liner I wrote, it says nothing specific. It implies nothing, except that maybe this character is passive.

Take the interactions and transitions and seemingly unimportant lines in your work and make them actually say something. Remember the books you’ve read where you breeze over the more humdrum action, the cooking of things, the driving to places, the going to class or work or whatever. How could the author have made that part that probably bored them to write into a bit that has significance to the character?

An English literature major with a creative writing minor, I take this shit a little too seriously. It also means that I look to add depth where there could easily be none.

I do shit like this to keep me thinking. There’s a brown bowl on the table in front of me right now. I could say “I looked at the brown monkey bowl and lacked the initiative to put it in the sink again.” Or I could say, “the only reason I’d bother to put the bowl in the already sky-high sink was because the monkey on it looked at me like I was doing something wrong. Like my entire life revolved around what it thought, and like I should be doing something to wash the brown out of my life in general.”

Sure, not fucking Shakespeare, but I haven’t even had a second cup of coffee. You see what I mean, though? Of course you do, Smarty Pantalones.

Your work as an author is to write something that nobody else would have written. Not just could have written, but would have written. It’s your job to come up with stuff that makes us see inside the character’s minds and their hearts. There’s a level of thinking that you naturally let us in on, but what does the character feel without saying “it felt like I sucked at life.” You get it.

Thank you, Summer, for giving me inspiration again to write with more depth and complexity, and for learning about characters in the most obscure ways.

Here’s an idea. Try this with like, regular people. When you’re cashiering at Stop and Shop, what does the crappy Boba Fett Velcro wallet say about the guy in the suit who’s carrying it? That lady who never smiles no matter how many times you smile at her, what would make her smile? Who took it away from her?

Long story short, be active in your work and interactions. It’s more fun that way.


You can find Summer at http://t.co/MgTqtKYFe6 and follow her on Twitter @SummerWier.

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